Demystifying Nibbana

Seattle Insight Meditation Center | Oct 2016

Demystifying Nibbana: Reflecting on the Third Ennobling Truth

The Buddha described Nibbana as the unshakable liberation of the heart, the unshakable deliverance of mind that is the goal of this noble life.

Talks in this series

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    Demystifying Nibbana: Introduction (1 of 11)

    by Christina Feldman | Oct 22, 2016

    Developing insight through listening, through reflective investigation, and through practice or cultivation. These three ways of learning and understanding the process of insight are described as a process of contemplative inquiry.

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    Demystifying Nibbana (2 of 11)

    by Christina Feldman | Oct 22, 2016

    Nibbana, the third of the ennobling truths, described by the Buddha described as the unshakable liberation of the heart. 

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    Demystifying Nibbana (3 of 11)

    by Christina Feldman | Oct 22, 2016

    Nibbana as the heart, the essence and ultimate goal of this life; the unshakable deliverance of mind that is the goal of this noble life.

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    Demystifying Nibbana (4 of 11)

    by Christina Feldman | Oct 22, 2016

    Question and answers thus far. (Note: The questions have been cut from the recording as Christina repeats each question before she answers.)

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    Demystifying Nibbana (5 of 11)

    by Christina Feldman | Oct 22, 2016

    Models of awakening, sometimes seen as distinguishing schools of Buddhism, are nuanced and interrelated in the early Buddhist texts presenting and describing the process of awakening.

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    Demystifying Nibbana (6 of 11)

    by Christina Feldman | Oct 22, 2016

    Stream entry is the significant stage of awakening. It is a release of the grasping and clinging that leads to process of self-construction, the attempt to create a state of permanence and certainty in the midst of a world that is not.

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    Demystifying Nibbana (7 of 11)

    by Christina Feldman | Oct 23, 2016

    Understanding the emptiness of personality view. The unshakable understanding of the emptiness of self is a fruition, and fruition is born of the deepening practice of insight. (A short recap of the previous talk (talk #6) and questions from participants.)

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    Demystifying Nibbana (8 of 11)

    by Christina Feldman | Oct 23, 2016

    The fruition, or the maturation, of the insight into the emptiness of personality view is the cessation of clinging to any view of “I am.” This is the most important pivotal transforming understanding of stream entry. There is no credibility given to the arising or view of self. It is empty of clinging, empty of fabrication. (Note: some long questions have been cut from the recording due to low volume. Christina repeats the questions before she answers.)

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    Demystifying Nibbana (9 of 11)

    by Christina Feldman | Oct 23, 2016

    Vital to keep in mind the context of the Buddha’s teaching. The Buddha always said his teaching was of one taste: his primary concern was the end of dukkha. The cultivation/path and the fruition/realization are inseparable. The Buddha said there are four factors necessary for realization.

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    Demystifying Nibbana (10 of 11)

    by Christina Feldman | Oct 23, 2016

    The Buddha offered samatha and metta as the two areas to be cultivated to prepare the mind for frameworks of contemplation. Metta brings the attitude of kindness, a befriending base, to meditation. Samatha develops the capacity of mind to sustain attentiveness, collectedness, a unification of body, mind and present moment; and in that collectedness sustain attention on any chosen object. (Note: Christina first answers a few questions; the talk begins about six minutes into the recording.)

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    Demystifying Nibbana (11 of 11)

    by Christina Feldman | Oct 23, 2016

    The boundless unshakable liberation of heart in the midst of it all. Approach this path as in intentional exploration in the service of understanding dukkha and bringing dukkha to an end. This indeed can be so.